JOM Editorial Term Ending

Today, my term as Associate Editor at Journal of Management has ended. I am incredibly grateful to Editor David Allen & Senior Associate Editor Taco Reus for offering me this amazing opportunity, and I learned a lot from handling more than 100 unique manuscripts (many for multiple revisions) and close to 100 review issue proposals during my three years at JOM. And I won’t be leaving JOM as I have been invited to join the incoming JOM editorial board and will also remain the AE for any manuscripts assigned to me during my term which are still in the review process.

2019 Academy of Management Annual Meeting

This year’s Academy of Management Annual Meeting is happening in Boston, MA. My co-authors and I are represented on the program with two presentations:

  • Levin, D. Z. & Walter, J. (2019). Is tie maintenance really necessary?
  • Ross, J. R., Mehra, A., Levin, D. Z., Walter, J. (2019). Dormant ties: A review and agenda for research.

Both presentations are part of a symposium Daniel and I organized:

  • “The Role of Memory and Cognition (vs. Activity and Behavior) in Social Networks.” Presenters: Jiyin Cao (Stony Brook), Edward Bishop Smith (Northwestern), You-Ta Chuang (York), Fu-Sheng Tsai (Cheng Shiu), Wenpin Tsai (Pennsylvania State), Martin J. Kilduff (University College London), Tiziana Casciaro (Toronto), Jason Rekus Ross (Kentucky), & Ajay Mehra (Kentucky). Discussant: Ronald S. Burt (Chicago).

I was also honored by receiving an “Outstanding Reviewer Award” by the Strategy Division.

The Coddling of the American Mind (2018)

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By Greg Lukianoff & Jonathan Haidt (Penguin Press)

In this scathing indictment of recent trends in parenting, education, politics, and the media, a First Amendment expert and a social psychologist take on three “great untruths”–what doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people–that contradict basic psychological principles about well-being and that result in a culture of safetyism which interferes with young people’s social, emotional, and intellectual development.

This excellent analysis of how “good intentions and bad ideas are setting up a generation for failure” is a must-read for young parents, educators, and anyone else interested in the future of our democracy.

Here’s the Atlantic article that formed the basis of this book.